Linked Descendants Resources

The Linked Descendants Working Group (LDWG) continues to gather together here a growing list of valuable resources:

 

BitterSweet Blog: Linked Through Slavery

 

In Support of African American Family History Research: What Can Enslaver Descendants Do?

African American family history and genealogy researchers often find their work made more difficult or blocked altogether by the institutional and individual legacies of slavery and the ways in which their ancestors were dehumanized – no names, no official documents, no census records, and so on. Descendants of enslaver families who have a particular interest in research are perfectly positioned to act on their desire to take reparative action by providing support to researchers who are looking for their formerly enslaved (or former enslaver) ancestors.

CLICK HERE to watch the video recording of this powerful session. CLICK HERE to download the PDF of 25 suggested actions descendants of enslaver families can take.

Iconic Activist James Meredith’s Black and White Families Reach a New Frontier – Together: Overcoming the Legacy of a White Supremacist

 

Listen to James Meredith and members of the Meredith and Campbell families, linked together through slavery, recount their family history, portray the impact and legacies of slavery they have experienced, and describe their way forward to connection and healing.

 

 

  • Watch this presentation on the CTTT YouTube Channel
  • You’ll find links to additional videos/resources in description below the video
  • Be sure and “subscribe” to the CTTT YouTube Channel to be notified whenever new content is added there.

 

 

From the 2021 National Gathering: TWO powerful sessions

The first was a Plenary Session for all registered participants titled Introduction to the Linked Descendants Working Group

Linked Descendants are people connected to one another through slavery and its legacies; people related through ownership, kinship, or violence. Linked descendants want to know the truth about their ancestors, discover their connections, maybe even heal a bit of the wounded past.

The second was a Breakout Session (one of 23) titled Facing the Truth of History & Facing Anger & Shame

This session invites us to look at a disturbing emotion that interferes with commitments to uncover the truths of national and/or family history: shame. Shame about the enslavement of ancestors and the grip oppression had on them; shame over the atrocities European Americans committed for 400 years and over enslavers in our lineage. Shame about our unconscious complicity in the continuation of systems, and behaviors of oppression. In presentations, breakout groups, and centering activities, a courageous group will face shame together and find ways to grapple with it more effectively.

  • Watch this session on the CTTT YouTube channel
  • Download a pdf version of the session handout HERE

 

Researching Family History: Finding Linked Descendants

Sharon Morgan and Tim Kilby are members of the Linked Desceants Working Group, experienced researchers into their own and others’ family histories, and guides and mentors for people newer to that work. Sharon and Tim were guest speakers at the Linked Descendants’ October 2020 meeting and presented “Researching Family History: Finding Linked Descendants.”

  • Watch the video of this informative session on the CTTT YouTube channel.
  • Download a pdf version of Sharon’s presentation HERE.

 

Trauma & Encountering Our Legacy of Slavery

Prinny Anderson leads this session on the intersection of genealogical research of family history connected to enslavement, connecting with linked descendants, how trauma can infuse this work, and what we can do to take care of ourselves along this journey of discovery.

  • Watch the video of this session on the CTTT YouTube Channel.
  • Download a pdf version of Prinny’s presentation HERE.
  • Download a list of readings on Trauma HERE.
  • Download a list of resources shared in “chat” HERE.

There are also many more Resources on the BitterSweet site:

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